Custom Search
Home | Site Map | What's New | Image Index | Copyright | Puzzles | Posters | ScienceViews | Transmedia Storytelling |

PHOTO INDEX OF
PRIMARY TARGETS
ASTEROIDS
COMETS
EARTH
JUPITER
KUIPER BELT
MARS
MERCURY
METEORITES
NEPTUNE
OORT CLOUD
PLUTO
SATURN
SOLAR SYSTEM
SPACE
SUN
URANUS
VENUS
ORDER PRINTS

OTHER PHOTO INDEXES
ALL TARGETS
PHOTO CATEGORIES

SCIENCEVIEWS
AMERICAN INDIAN
AMPHIBIANS
BIRDS
BUGS
FINE ART
FOSSILS
THE ISLANDS
HISTORICAL PHOTOS
MAMMALS
OTHER
PARKS
PLANTS
RELIGIOUS
REPTILES
SCIENCEVIEWS PRINTS

Coast and Andes Mountains, Chile

Target Name:  Earth
Spacecraft:  Space Shuttle
Produced by:  NASA
Copyright: Copyright Free; Caption LPI
Cross Reference:  ISS006-E-34656
Date Taken:  2003-02-27

Related Document
Download Options

NameTypeWidth x HeightSize
chile.jpgJPEG640 x 42436K
chile.jpgJPEG1400 x 927142K
chile.jpgJPEG3032 x 2007912K

The Andes mountains form one of the longest continuous mountain ranges on Earth, extending from the shores of the Caribbean as far south as the Magellan Straits. Perhaps the most surprising aspect of this range is how narrow it is over much of its length - the high part of the range is typically less than 150 kilometers (93 miles) broad. Illustrated is the section of the Andes near Coquimbo, Chile, where the highest peaks are 6,300 meters (20,670 feet). Low lighting and the oblique perspective emphasize the narrowness of the range, which forms a formidable natural obstacle, and explains how the improbably long and thin country of Chile acquired its identity.

In this part of the range, active volcanism is absent. The Benioff zone in this region has a very shallow dip (10°). To both north and south, the Benioff zone dips more steeply (30°) and volcanism is well developed. Clouds illuminated by the low sun hang over the Argentine Pampas beyond the Andes and illustrate the marked climatic differences between different sides of the Andes. In the south, the Chilean side of the Andes tends to be well watered and fertile, while the pampas are in rain shadow and tend to be very dry. Further north, the Chilean coast is exceptionally dry (and forms the Atacama desert) while the eastern slopes are much wetter.

Copyright © 1995-2013 by Calvin J. Hamilton. All rights reserved.